Snowball the Dancing Cockatoo
Bauhan, ISBN 978-087233-156-3
Snowball the Dancing Cockatoo

SNOWBALL THE DANCING COCKATOO, for kids in grades 3 and up, is the true story of how an unwanted cockatoo achieved international fame as a YouTube sensation, television star, and scientific study subject, all by rocking out to the beat of his favorite tunes. Snowball tells the story (well, this is what he would have said if his language skills were as good as his dancing.) But everything he says is true, including how he inspired the World’s First Bird Dance-Off Contest, became the subject of a groundbreaking study about music and the brain, and has now gone into teaching children how to dance and doing charity work.

The book is illustrated with the whimsical paintings of my friend, Judith Oksner.

All author’s proceeds from this book go to benefit Bird Lovers Only, the bird rescue where Snowball now lives.

How to get the book?

Reviews

“Montgomery delights and educates all in one go, and adds much to the legend that is the renowned Snowball. The colourful and cheeky illustrations by Judith Oksner add to the fun. A clever book to be enjoyed.”
—World Parrot Trust e-newsletter, Flock Talk


“This is the true story of how an unwanted cockatoo achieved international fame as a YouTube sensation (more than 5 million hits!), television star, and scientific study subject, all by rocking out to the beat of his favorite tunes. Snowball tells the story with his own spirited psitticine spin. But everything he says is true, including how he inspired the World’s First Bird Dance-Off Contest, became the subject of a groundbreaking study about music and the brain, and has now gone into teaching children how to dance and doing charity work. Fans of Snowball should enjoy this book.”
—Ian Paulsen in The Guardian (U.K.)


“This is a book to celebrate. My professional life in part is to assess cognitive development in children. Utilizing the multiple intelligence approach for those children who have a history or diagnosis of a reading disability can be trying when the child associates reading with a negative experience. [But] when a child sees Snowball dance, when a child interacts with animals, curiosity overrides the tendency to shun reading. Thank you, Irena Schulz,for seeing the beauty in Snowball and sharing him with the world. Both of you have touched the hearts of many more than you know, and many more to come.”
—Charlene Crecz